Day 5 Terherne – Hommerts

After breakfast Martin went in search of the man making the ‘oooh’. He wasn’t in, perhaps a bit early we thought at 08.30, so we sought out the mechanic again to help us out with a few more questions about the boat. We couldn’t find a bilge pump, and the water pressure had gotten so low, that only a dribble could be squeezed from the taps now, and Martin had some questions about the two diesel tanks on the boat. However, the mechanic was busy also. A little frustrated, we set about making the boat ready to depart as soon as possible.

Eventually the man making the ‘oooh’ turned up at this workshop, but had completely forgotten about making our ‘oooh’, but promised us that he could make it in 30 minutes, which he did. One of the staff fitted it, and that again took about 30 minutes.

Not long after this, we were visited by the mechanic, who informed us firstly, that we did not have a bilge pump, and that we in fact have four diesel tanks not two! Unfortunately though he could not fix the pressure pump for the water, and so we are relegated to using water from a water canister, and boiling water in a kettle to get hot water. As for the loo (which is a sea toilet) we have chuck some water down from a bucket before flushing. The mechanic also advised that whilst we are using the boat every day for long journeys we should be greasing the prop. shaft every day. So we bought a grease gun and prop. shaft grease from the marina. As with all things at the marina we could not pay using a credit card, so this together with the repairs depleted our available cash a bit.

We had not had time at this point to cycle to Akkrum to get more cash, and the rain was hammering down, so one kind member of staff drove us to Akkrum instead. At this point (about 2pm) the invoice for the repairs had not been drawn up, and we were told that it wouldn’t be available until at least 4pm. We were desperate to get going at this point, so this was not welcome news!!

We were finally ready to leave after having filled up with diesel at 17.30. We had said goodbye to Kees at the marina earlier, and now we said our farewells to David and Val, who kindly came out to take some photo’s for us and wave us off. Martin at this point was very excited and champing at the bit to get going, I on the other hand was very apprehensive, but this left me after we had been motoring for about half an hour. I even became brave enough to take the wheel for a bit. 

A view of Terherne after having said goodbye to
David and Val.

We covered about 9.5km this evening, and found a mooring along the canal at Hommerts. It is quiet and in the middle of nowhere, and yet we can regularly see cargo barges passing us carrying anything from propeller blades for wind turbines, to huge drums of fuel. In contrast, we have also seen quite a lot of birdlife so far too. What we think was a Long Eared Owl, a Great Crested Grebe, Duck, Geese, and a lone Swan. I took a photo of a group of Cormorant nests, but I was a bit far away, but I have included it anyway. We have eaten and finally retired with a beer. I wonder what tomorrow will bring? 

One of the many large barges that we have seen since setting
on our journey
Cormmorant nests
We passed our first windmill today 

7 comments on “Day 5 Terherne – Hommerts

  1. Well done folks. Look out for the giant Anthony Gormley statue tomorrow – an impressive feat of engineering and design. You will see it as you pass Lelystad.

  2. It is called 'Exposure' and was assembled 7 years ago. As you get closer to it the complex design becomes more abstract and the engineering more impressive. Gormley generally uses his own body as a starting point. In this case scaled up significantly! Especially dramatic when compared to his statue above Blackwells in Broad Street, Oxford.

  3. This blog is beginning to resemble Passage To Junaeu by Jonathan Raban. Your account is compelling and we cannot wait for the next instalment. Best wishes for the next chapter.

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